New high resolution methane emissions measuring satellite launched

GHGSat methane emissions measuring satellites
GHGSat methane emissions measuring satellites

In 2016 a privately-funded startup GHGSat launched a proof-of-concept cubesat named “Claire” weighing 15 kg to measure methane emissions from individual oil and gas wells, refineries, compressor stations, landfills, animal feedlots, rice paddies, and natural sources. The objective was to provide a satellite-based methane measuring device that would enable private industry to estimate emissions from its own facilities anywhere in the world. About the size of a microwave oven Claire orbits the Earth every 90 minutes. Its field of view is 12 km x 12 km and it has a spatial resolution of about 50 metres. Claire is able to measure emissions from over 1,000 sites per year.  A second satellite, GHGSat-C1 or “Iris”, has just been launched by Arianespace that has higher resolution (25 metres) and will be able to measure emissions much more rapidly with a 10x performance improvement compared to Claire.